FOREX.com vs FXCM 2020 - ForexBrokers.com

Receive FOREX Payments TransferWise vs FX International

Do you have any experience on using FX International (from amex) to receive payments from customers from different countries with different currencies than USD?
I'm actually using TranferWise, but I see that you get reward points if you use FX International. Do you know if there a comparison chart anywhere to check the rates/fees differencies?
submitted by michelemaro to personalfinance [link] [comments]

FX Street vs Forex Pros vs Twitter

submitted by rfinberg to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3
Welcome to the third and final part of this chapter.
Thank you all for the 100s of comments and upvotes - maybe this post will take us above 1,000 for this topic!
Keep any feedback or questions coming in the replies below.
Before you read this note, please start with Part I and then Part II so it hangs together and makes sense.
Part III
  • Squeezes and other risks
  • Market positioning
  • Bet correlation
  • Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

Squeezes and other risks

We are going to cover three common risks that traders face: events; squeezes, asymmetric bets.

Events

Economic releases can cause large short-term volatility. The most famous is Non Farm Payrolls, which is the most widely watched measure of US employment levels and affects the price of many instruments.On an NFP announcement currencies like EURUSD might jump (or drop) 100 pips no problem.
This is fine and there are trading strategies that one may employ around this but the key thing is to be aware of these releases.You can find economic calendars all over the internet - including on this site - and you need only check if there are any major releases each day or week.
For example, if you are trading off some intraday chart and scalping a few pips here and there it would be highly sensible to go into a known data release flat as it is pure coin-toss and not the reason for your trading. It only takes five minutes each day to plan for the day ahead so do not get caught out by this. Many retail traders get stopped out on such events when price volatility is at its peak.

Squeezes

Short squeezes bring a lot of danger and perhaps some opportunity.
The story of VW and Porsche is the best short squeeze ever. Throughout these articles we've used FX examples wherever possible but in this one instance the concept (which is also highly relevant in FX) is best illustrated with an historical lesson from a different asset class.
A short squeeze is when a participant ends up in a short position they are forced to cover. Especially when the rest of the market knows that this participant can be bullied into stopping out at terrible levels, provided the market can briefly drive the price into their pain zone.

There's a reason for the car, don't worry
Hedge funds had been shorting VW stock. However the amount of VW stock available to buy in the open market was actually quite limited. The local government owned a chunk and Porsche itself had bought and locked away around 30%. Neither of these would sell to the hedge-funds so a good amount of the stock was un-buyable at any price.
If you sell or short a stock you must be prepared to buy it back to go flat at some point.
To cut a long story short, Porsche bought a lot of call options on VW stock. These options gave them the right to purchase VW stock from banks at slightly above market price.
Eventually the banks who had sold these options realised there was no VW stock to go out and buy since the German government wouldn’t sell its allocation and Porsche wouldn’t either. If Porsche called in the options the banks were in trouble.
Porsche called in the options which forced the shorts to buy stock - at whatever price they could get it.
The price squeezed higher as those that were short got massively squeezed and stopped out. For one brief moment in 2008, VW was the world’s most valuable company. Shorts were burned hard.

Incredible event
Porsche apparently made $11.5 billion on the trade. The BBC described Porsche as “a hedge fund with a carmaker attached.”
If this all seems exotic then know that the same thing happens in FX all the time. If everyone in the market is talking about a key level in EURUSD being 1.2050 then you can bet the market will try to push through 1.2050 just to take out any short stops at that level. Whether it then rallies higher or fails and trades back lower is a different matter entirely.
This brings us on to the matter of crowded trades. We will look at positioning in more detail in the next section. Crowded trades are dangerous for PNL. If everyone believes EURUSD is going down and has already sold EURUSD then you run the risk of a short squeeze.
For additional selling to take place you need a very good reason for people to add to their position whereas a move in the other direction could force mass buying to cover their shorts.
A trading mentor when I worked at the investment bank once advised me:
Always think about which move would cause the maximum people the maximum pain. That move is precisely what you should be watching out for at all times.

Asymmetric losses

Also known as picking up pennies in front of a steamroller. This risk has caught out many a retail trader. Sometimes it is referred to as a "negative skew" strategy.
Ideally what you are looking for is asymmetric risk trade set-ups: that is where the downside is clearly defined and smaller than the upside. What you want to avoid is the opposite.
A famous example of this going wrong was the Swiss National Bank de-peg in 2012.
The Swiss National Bank had said they would defend the price of EURCHF so that it did not go below 1.2. Many people believed it could never go below 1.2 due to this. Many retail traders therefore opted for a strategy that some describe as ‘picking up pennies in front of a steam-roller’.
They would would buy EURCHF above the peg level and hope for a tiny rally of several pips before selling them back and keep doing this repeatedly. Often they were highly leveraged at 100:1 so that they could amplify the profit of the tiny 5-10 pip rally.
Then this happened.

Something that changed FX markets forever
The SNB suddenly did the unthinkable. They stopped defending the price. CHF jumped and so EURCHF (the number of CHF per 1 EUR) dropped to new lows very fast. Clearly, this trade had horrific risk : reward asymmetry: you risked 30% to make 0.05%.
Other strategies like naively selling options have the same result. You win a small amount of money each day and then spectacularly blow up at some point down the line.

Market positioning

We have talked about short squeezes. But how do you know what the market position is? And should you care?
Let’s start with the first. You should definitely care.
Let’s imagine the entire market is exceptionally long EURUSD and positioning reaches extreme levels. This makes EURUSD very vulnerable.
To keep the price going higher EURUSD needs to attract fresh buy orders. If everyone is already long and has no room to add, what can incentivise people to keep buying? The news flow might be good. They may believe EURUSD goes higher. But they have already bought and have their maximum position on.
On the flip side, if there’s an unexpected event and EURUSD gaps lower you will have the entire market trying to exit the position at the same time. Like a herd of cows running through a single doorway. Messy.
We are going to look at this in more detail in a later chapter, where we discuss ‘carry’ trades. For now this TRYJPY chart might provide some idea of what a rush to the exits of a crowded position looks like.

A carry trade position clear-out in action
Knowing if the market is currently at extreme levels of long or short can therefore be helpful.
The CFTC makes available a weekly report, which details the overall positions of speculative traders “Non Commercial Traders” in some of the major futures products. This includes futures tied to deliverable FX pairs such as EURUSD as well as products such as gold. The report is called “CFTC Commitments of Traders” ("COT").
This is a great benchmark. It is far more representative of the overall market than the proprietary ones offered by retail brokers as it covers a far larger cross-section of the institutional market.
Generally market participants will not pay a lot of attention to commercial hedgers, which are also detailed in the report. This data is worth tracking but these folks are simply hedging real-world transactions rather than speculating so their activity is far less revealing and far more noisy.
You can find the data online for free and download it directly here.

Raw format is kinda hard to work with

However, many websites will chart this for you free of charge and you may find it more convenient to look at it that way. Just google “CFTC positioning charts”.

But you can easily get visualisations
You can visually spot extreme positioning. It is extremely powerful.
Bear in mind the reports come out Friday afternoon US time and the report is a snapshot up to the prior Tuesday. That means it is a lagged report - by the time it is released it is a few days out of date. For longer term trades where you hold positions for weeks this is of course still pretty helpful information.
As well as the absolute level (is the speculative market net long or short) you can also use this to pick up on changes in positioning.
For example if bad news comes out how much does the net short increase? If good news comes out, the market may remain net short but how much did they buy back?
A lot of traders ask themselves “Does the market have this trade on?” The positioning data is a good method for answering this. It provides a good finger on the pulse of the wider market sentiment and activity.
For example you might say: “There was lots of noise about the good employment numbers in the US. However, there wasn’t actually a lot of position change on the back of it. Maybe everyone who wants to buy already has. What would happen now if bad news came out?”
In general traders will be wary of entering a crowded position because it will be hard to attract additional buyers or sellers and there could be an aggressive exit.
If you want to enter a trade that is showing extreme levels of positioning you must think carefully about this dynamic.

Bet correlation

Retail traders often drastically underestimate how correlated their bets are.
Through bitter experience, I have learned that a mistake in position correlation is the root of some of the most serious problems in trading. If you have eight highly correlated positions, then you are really trading one position that is eight times as large.
Bruce Kovner of hedge fund, Caxton Associates
For example, if you are trading a bunch of pairs against the USD you will end up with a simply huge USD exposure. A single USD-trigger can ruin all your bets. Your ideal scenario — and it isn’t always possible — would be to have a highly diversified portfolio of bets that do not move in tandem.
Look at this chart. Inverted USD index (DXY) is green. AUDUSD is orange. EURUSD is blue.

Chart from TradingView
So the whole thing is just one big USD trade! If you are long AUDUSD, long EURUSD, and short DXY you have three anti USD bets that are all likely to work or fail together.
The more diversified your portfolio of bets are, the more risk you can take on each.
There’s a really good video, explaining the benefits of diversification from Ray Dalio.
A systematic fund with access to an investable universe of 10,000 instruments has more opportunity to make a better risk-adjusted return than a trader who only focuses on three symbols. Diversification really is the closest thing to a free lunch in finance.
But let’s be pragmatic and realistic. Human retail traders don’t have capacity to run even one hundred bets at a time. More realistic would be an average of 2-3 trades on simultaneously. So what can be done?
For example:
  • You might diversify across time horizons by having a mix of short-term and long-term trades.
  • You might diversify across asset classes - trading some FX but also crypto and equities.
  • You might diversify your trade generation approach so you are not relying on the same indicators or drivers on each trade.
  • You might diversify your exposure to the market regime by having some trades that assume a trend will continue (momentum) and some that assume we will be range-bound (carry).
And so on. Basically you want to scan your portfolio of trades and make sure you are not putting all your eggs in one basket. If some trades underperform others will perform - assuming the bets are not correlated - and that way you can ensure your overall portfolio takes less risk per unit of return.
The key thing is to start thinking about a portfolio of bets and what each new trade offers to your existing portfolio of risk. Will it diversify or amplify a current exposure?

Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

One common mistake is to get bored and restless and put on crap trades. This just means trades in which you have low conviction.
It is perfectly fine not to trade. If you feel like you do not understand the market at a particular point, simply choose not to trade.
Flat is a position.
Do not waste your bullets on rubbish trades. Only enter a trade when you have carefully considered it from all angles and feel good about the risk. This will make it far easier to hold onto the trade if it moves against you at any point. You actually believe in it.
Equally, you need to set monthly limits. A standard limit might be a 10% account balance stop per month. At that point you close all your positions immediately and stop trading till next month.

Be strict with yourself and walk away
Let’s assume you started the year with $100k and made 5% in January so enter Feb with $105k balance. Your stop is therefore 10% of $105k or $10.5k . If your account balance dips to $94.5k ($105k-$10.5k) then you stop yourself out and don’t resume trading till March the first.
Having monthly calendar breaks is nice for another reason. Say you made a load of money in January. You don’t want to start February feeling you are up 5% or it is too tempting to avoid trading all month and protect the existing win. Each month and each year should feel like a clean slate and an independent period.
Everyone has trading slumps. It is perfectly normal. It will definitely happen to you at some stage. The trick is to take a break and refocus. Conserve your capital by not trading a lot whilst you are on a losing streak. This period will be much harder for you emotionally and you’ll end up making suboptimal decisions. An enforced break will help you see the bigger picture.
Put in place a process before you start trading and then it’ll be easy to follow and will feel much less emotional. Remember: the market doesn’t care if you win or lose, it is nothing personal.
When your head has cooled and you feel calm you return the next month and begin the task of building back your account balance.

That's a wrap on risk management

Thanks for taking time to read this three-part chapter on risk management. I hope you enjoyed it. Do comment in the replies if you have any questions or feedback.
Remember: the most important part of trading is not making money. It is not losing money. Always start with that principle. I hope these three notes have provided some food for thought on how you might approach risk management and are of practical use to you when trading. Avoiding mistakes is not a sexy tagline but it is an effective and reliable way to improve results.
Next up I will be writing about an exciting topic I think many traders should look at rather differently: news trading. Please follow on here to receive notifications and the broad outline is below.
News Trading Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use the economic calendar
  • Reading the economic calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Interest rates
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking
News Trading Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The mysterious 'position trim' effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
***

Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: News trading and second order thinking part 2/2

Former investment bank FX trader: News trading and second order thinking part 2/2
Thanks for all the upvotes and comments on the previous pieces:
From the first half of the news trading note we learned some ways to estimate what is priced in by the market. We learned that we are trading any gap in market expectations rather than the result itself. A good result when the market expected a fantastic result is disappointing! We also looked at second order thinking. After all that, I hope the reaction of prices to events is starting to make more sense to you.

Before you understand the core concepts of pricing in and second order thinking, price reactions to events can seem mystifying at times
We'll add one thought-provoking quote. Keynes (that rare economist who also managed institutional money) offered this analogy. He compared selecting investments to a beauty contest in which newspaper readers would write in with their votes and win a prize if their votes most closely matched the six most popularly selected women across all readers:
It is not a case of choosing those (faces) which, to the best of one’s judgment, are really the prettiest, nor even those which average opinions genuinely thinks the prettiest. We have reached the third degree where we devote our intelligences to anticipating what average opinion expects the average opinion to be.
Trading is no different. You are trying to anticipate how other traders will react to news and how that will move prices. Perhaps you disagree with their reaction. Still, if you can anticipate what it will be you would be sensible to act upon it. Don't forget: meanwhile they are also trying to anticipate what you and everyone else will do.

Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The trimming position effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases

Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases

The majority of releases are quantitative. All that means is there’s some number. Like unemployment figures or GDP.
Historic results provide interesting context. We are looking below the Australian unemployment rate which is released monthly. If you plot it out a few years back you can spot a clear trend, which got massively reversed. Knowing this trend gives you additional information when the figure is released. In the same way prices can trend so do economic data.

A great resource that's totally free to use
This makes sense: if for example things are getting steadily better in the economy you’d expect to see unemployment steadily going down.
Knowing the trend and how much noise there is in the data gives you an informational edge over lazy traders.
For example, when we see the spike above 6% on the above you’d instantly know it was crazy and a huge trading opportunity since a) the fluctuations month on month are normally tiny and b) it is a huge reversal of the long-term trend.
Would all the other AUDUSD traders know and react proportionately? If not and yet they still trade, their laziness may be an opportunity for more informed traders to make some money.
Tradingeconomics.com offers really high quality analysis. You can see all the major indicators for each country. Clicking them brings up their history as well as an explanation of what they show.
For example, here’s German Consumer Confidence.

Helpful context
There are also qualitative events. Normally these are speeches by Central Bankers.
There are whole blogs dedicated to closely reading such texts and looking for subtle changes in direction or opinion on the economy. Stuff like how often does the phrase "in a good place" come up when the Chair of the Fed speaks. It is pretty dry stuff. Yet these are leading indicators of how each member may vote to set interest rates. Ed Yardeni is the go-to guy on central banks.

Data surprise index

The other thing you might look at is something investment banks produce for their customers. A data surprise index. I am not sure if these are available in retail land - there's no reason they shouldn't be but the economic calendars online are very basic.
You’ll remember we talked about data not being good or bad of itself but good or bad relative to what was expected. These indices measure this difference.
If results are consistently better than analysts expect then you’ll see a positive number. If they are consistently worse than analysts expect a negative number. You can see they tend to swing from positive to negative.

Mean reversion at its best! Data surprise indices measure how much better or worse data came in vs forecast
There are many theories for this but in general people consider that analysts herd around the consensus. They are scared to be outliers and look ‘wrong’ or ‘stupid’ so they instead place estimates close to the pack of their peers.
When economic conditions change they may therefore be slow to update. When they are wrong consistently - say too bearish - they eventually flip the other way and become too bullish.
These charts can be interesting to give you an idea of how the recent data releases have been versus market expectations. You may try to spot the turning points in macroeconomic data that drive long term currency prices and trends.

Using recent events to predict future reactions

The market reaction function is the most important thing on an economic calendar in many ways. It means: what will happen to the price if the data is better or worse than the market expects?
That seems easy to answer but it is not.
Consider the example of consumer confidence we had earlier.
  • Many times the market will shrug and ignore it.
  • But when the economic recovery is predicated on a strong consumer it may move markets a lot.
Or consider the S&P index of US stocks (Wall Street).
  • If you get good economic data that beats analyst estimates surely it should go up? Well, sometimes that is certainly the case.
  • But good economic data might result in the US Central Bank raising interest rates. Raising interest rates will generally make the stock market go down!
So better than expected data could make the S&P go up (“the economy is great”) or down (“the Fed is more likely to raise rates”). It depends. The market can interpret the same data totally differently at different times.
One clue is to look at what happened to the price of risk assets at the last event.
For example, let’s say we looked at unemployment and it came in a lot worse than forecast last month. What happened to the S&P back then?

2% drop last time on a 'worse than expected' number ... so it it is 'better than expected' best guess is we rally 2% higher
So this tells us that - at least for our most recent event - the S&P moved 2% lower on a far worse than expected number. This gives us some guidance as to what it might do next time and the direction. Bad number = lower S&P. For a huge surprise 2% is the size of move we’d expect.
Again - this is a real limitation of online calendars. They should show next to the historic results (expected/actual) the reaction of various instruments.

Buy the rumour, sell the fact

A final example of an unpredictable reaction relates to the old rule of ‘Buy the rumour, sell the fact.’ This captures the tendency for markets to anticipate events and then reverse when they occur.

Buy the rumour, sell the fact
In short: people take profit and close their positions when what they expected to happen is confirmed.
So we have to decide which driver is most important to the market at any point in time. You obviously cannot ask every participant. The best way to do it is to look at what happened recently. Look at the price action during recent releases and you will get a feel for how much the market moves and in which direction.

Trimming or taking off positions

One thing to note is that events sometimes give smart participants information about positioning. This is because many traders take off or reduce positions ahead of big news events for risk management purposes.
Imagine we see GBPUSD rises in the hour before GDP release. That probably indicates the market is short and has taken off / flattened its positions.

The price action before an event can tell you about speculative positioning
If GDP is merely in line with expectations those same people are likely to add back their positions. They avoided a potential banana skin. This is why sometimes the market moves on an event that seemingly was bang on consensus.
But you have learned something. The speculative market is short and may prove vulnerable to a squeeze.

Two kinds of reversals

Fairly often you’ll see the market move in one direction on a release then turn around and go the other way.
These are known as reversals. Traders will often ‘fade’ a move, meaning bet against it and expect it to reverse.

Logical reversals

Sometimes this happens when the data looks good at first glance but the details don’t support it.
For example, say the headline is very bullish on German manufacturing numbers but then a minute later it becomes clear the company who releases the data has changed methodology or believes the number is driven by a one-off event. Or maybe the headline number is positive but buried in the detail there is a very negative revision to previous numbers.
Fading the initial spike is one way to trade news. Try looking at what the price action is one minute after the event and thirty minutes afterwards on historic releases.

Crazy reversals


Some reversals don't make sense
Sometimes a reversal happens for seemingly no fundamental reason. Say you get clearly positive news that is better than anyone expects. There are no caveats to the positive number. Yet the price briefly spikes up and then falls hard. What on earth?
This is a pure supply and demand thing. Even on bullish news the market cannot sustain a rally. The market is telling you it wants to sell this asset. Try not to get in its way.

Some key releases

As we have already discussed, different releases are important at different times. However, we’ll look at some consistently important ones in this final section.

Interest rates decisions

These can sometimes be unscheduled. However, normally the decisions are announced monthly. The exact process varies for each central bank. Typically there’s a headline decision e.g. maintain 0.75% rate.
You may also see “minutes” of the meeting in which the decision was reached and a vote tally e.g. 7 for maintain, 2 for lower rates. These are always top-tier data releases and have capacity to move the currency a lot.
A hawkish central bank (higher rates) will tend to move a currency higher whilst a dovish central bank (lower rates) will tend to move a currency lower.
A central banker speaking is always a big event

Non farm payrolls

These are released once per month. This is another top-tier release that will move all USD pairs as well as equities.
There are three numbers:
  • The headline number of jobs created (bigger is better)
  • The unemployment rate (smaller is better)
  • Average hourly earnings (depends)
Bear in mind these headline numbers are often off by around 75,000. If a report comes in +/- 25,000 of the forecast, that is probably a non event.
In general a positive response should move the USD higher but check recent price action.
Other countries each have their own unemployment data releases but this is the single most important release.

Surveys

There are various types of surveys: consumer confidence; house price expectations; purchasing managers index etc.
Each one basically asks a group of people if they expect to make more purchases or activity in their area of expertise to rise. There are so many we won’t go into each one here.
A really useful tool is the tradingeconomics.com economic indicators for each country. You can see all the major indicators and an explanation of each plus the historic results.

GDP

Gross Domestic Product is another big release. It is a measure of how much a country’s economy is growing.
In general the market focuses more on ‘advance’ GDP forecasts more than ‘final’ numbers, which are often released at the same time.
This is because the final figures are accurate but by the time they come around the market has already seen all the inputs. The advance figure tends to be less accurate but incorporates new information that the market may not have known before the release.
In general a strong GDP number is good for the domestic currency.

Inflation

Countries tend to release measures of inflation (increase in prices) each month. These releases are important mainly because they may influence the future decisions of the central bank, when setting the interest rate.
See the FX fundamentals section for more details.

Industrial data

Things like factory orders or or inventory levels. These can provide a leading indicator of the strength of the economy.
These numbers can be extremely volatile. This is because a one-off large order can drive the numbers well outside usual levels.
Pay careful attention to previous releases so you have a sense of how noisy each release is and what kind of moves might be expected.

Comments

Often there is really good stuff in the comments/replies. Check out 'squitstoomuch' for some excellent observations on why some news sources are noisy but early (think: Twitter, ZeroHedge). The Softbank story is a good recent example: was in ZeroHedge a day before the FT but the market moved on the FT. Also an interesting comment on mistakes, which definitely happen on breaking news, and can cause massive reversals.

submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: news trading and second order thinking

Former investment bank FX trader: news trading and second order thinking
Thanks to everyone who responded to the previous pieces on risk management. We ended up with nearly 2,000 upvotes and I'm delighted so many of you found it useful.
This time we're going to focus on a new area: reacting to and trading around news and fundamental developments.
A lot of people get this totally wrong and the main reason is that they trade the news at face value, without considering what the market had already priced in. If you've ever seen what you consider to be "good" or "better than forecast" news come out and yet been confused as the pair did nothing or moved in the opposite direction to expected, read on...
We are going to do this in two parts.
Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use an economic calendar
  • How to read the calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Rates decisions
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking

Introduction

Knowing how to use and benefit from the economic calendar is key for all traders - not just news traders.
In this chapter we are going to take a practical look at how to use the economic calendar. We are also going to look at how to interpret news using second order thinking.
The key concept is learning what has already been ‘priced in’ by the market so we can estimate how the market price might react to the new information.

Why use an economic calendar

The economic calendar contains all the scheduled economic releases for that day and week. Even if you purely trade based on technical analysis, you still must know what is in store.

https://preview.redd.it/20xdiq6gq4k51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=6cd47186db1039be7df4d7ad6782de36da48f1db
Why? Three main reasons.
Firstly, releases can help provide direction. They create trends. For example if GBPUSD has been fluctuating aimlessly within a range and suddenly the Bank of England starts raising rates you better believe the British Pound will start to move. Big news events often start long-term trends which you can trade around.
Secondly, a lot of the volatility occurs around these events. This is because these events give the market new information. Prior to a big scheduled release like the US Non Farm Payrolls you might find no one wants to take a big position. After it is released the market may move violently and potentially not just in a single direction - often prices may overshoot and come back down. Even without a trend this volatility provides lots of trading opportunities for the day trader.

https://preview.redd.it/u17iwbhiq4k51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=98ea8ed154c9468cb62037668c38e7387f2435af
Finally, these releases can change trends. Going into a huge release because of a technical indicator makes little sense. Everything could reverse and stop you out in a moment. You need to be aware of which events are likely to influence the positions you have on so you can decide whether to keep the positions or flatten exposure before the binary event for which you have no edge.
Most traders will therefore ‘scan’ the calendar for the week ahead, noting what the big events are and when they will occur. Then you can focus on each day at a time.

Reading the economic calendar


Most calendars show events cut by trading day. Helpfully they adjust the time of each release to your own timezone. For example we can see that the Bank of Japan Interest Rate decision is happening at 4am local time for this particular London-based trader.

https://preview.redd.it/lmx0q9qoq4k51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c6e9e1533b1ba236e51296de8db3be55dfa78ba1

Note that some events do not happen at a specific time. Think of a Central Banker’s speech for example - this can go on for an hour. It is not like an economic statistic that gets released at a precise time. Clicking the finger emoji will open up additional information on each event.

Event importance

How do you define importance? Well, some events are always unimportant. With the greatest of respect to Italian farmers, nobody cares about mundane releases like Italian farm productivity figures.
Other events always seem to be important. That means, markets consistently react to them and prices move. Interest rate decisions are an example of consistently high importance events.
So the Medium and High can be thought of as guides to how much each event typically affects markets. They are not perfect guides, however, as different events are more or less important depending on the circumstances.
For example, imagine the UK economy was undergoing a consumer-led recovery. The Central Bank has said it would raise interest rates (making GBPUSD move higher) if they feel the consumer is confident.
Consumer confidence data would suddenly become an extremely important event. At other times, when the Central Bank has not said it is focused on the consumer, this release might be near irrelevant.

Knowing what's priced in

Next to each piece of economic data you can normally see three figures. Actual, Forecast, and Previous.
  • Actual refers to the number as it is released.
  • Forecast refers to the consensus estimate from analysts.
  • Previous is what it was last time.
We are going to look at this in a bit more detail later but what you care about is when numbers are better or worse than expected. Whether a number is ‘good’ or ‘bad’ really does not matter much. Yes, really.

Once you understand that markets move based on the news vs expectations, you will be less confused by price action around events

This is a common misunderstanding. Say everyone is expecting ‘great’ economic data and it comes out as ‘good’. Does the price go up?
You might think it should. After all, the economic data was good. However, everyone expected it to be great and it was just … good. The great release was ‘priced in’ by the market already. Most likely the price will be disappointed and go down.
By priced in we simply mean that the market expected it and already bought or sold. The information was already in the price before the announcement.
Incidentally the official forecasts can be pretty stale and might not accurately capture what active traders in the market expect. See the following example.

An example of pricing in

For example, let’s say the market is focused on the number of Tesla deliveries. Analysts think it’ll be 100,000 this quarter. But Elon Musk tweets something that hints he’s really, really, really looking forward to the analyst call. Tesla’s price ticks higher after the tweet as traders put on positions, reflecting the sentiment that Tesla is likely to massively beat the 100,000. (This example is not a real one - it just serves to illustrate the concept.)

Tesla deliveries are up hugely vs last quarter ... but they are disappointing vs market expectations ... what do you think will happen to the stock?

On the day it turns out Tesla hit 101,000. A better than the officially forecasted result - sure - but only marginally. Way below what readers of Musk's twitter account might have thought. Disappointed traders may sell their longs and close out the positions. The stock might go down on ‘good’ results because the market had priced in something even better. (This example is not a real one - it just serves to illustrate the concept.)

Surveys

It can be a little hard to know what the market really expects. Often the published forecasts are stale and do not reflect what actual traders and investors are looking for.
One of the most effective ways is a simple survey of investors. Something like a Twitter poll like this one from CNBC is freely available and not a bad barometer.
CNBC, Bloomberg and other business TV stations often have polls on their Twitter accounts that let you know what others are expecting

Interest rates decisions

We know that interest rates heavily affect currency prices.
For major interest rate decisions there’s a great tool on the CME’s website that you can use.

See the link for a demo

This gives you a % probability of each interest rate level, implied by traded prices in the bond futures market. For example, in the case above the market thinks there’s a 20% chance the Fed will cut rates to 75-100bp.
Obviously this is far more accurate than analyst estimates because it uses actual bond prices where market participants are directly taking risk and placing bets. It basically looks at what interest rate traders are willing to lend at just before/after the date of the central bank meeting to imply the odds that the market ascribes to a change on that date.
Always try to estimate what the market has priced in. That way you have some context for whether the release really was better or worse than expected.

Second order thinking

You have to know what the market expects to try and guess how it’ll react. This is referred to by Howard Marks of Oaktree as second-level thinking. His explanation is so clear I am going to quote extensively.
It really is hard to improve on this clarity of thought:
First-level thinking is simplistic and superficial, and just about everyone can do it (a bad sign for anything involving an attempt at superiority). All the first-level thinker needs is an opinion about the future, as in “The outlook for the company is favorable, meaning the stock will go up.” Second-level thinking is deep, complex and convoluted.
Howard Marks
He explains first-level thinking:
The first-level thinker simply looks for the highest quality company, the best product, the fastest earnings growth or the lowest p/e ratio. He’s ignorant of the very existence of a second level at which to think, and of the need to pursue it.
Howard Marks
The above describes the guy who sees a 101,000 result and buys Tesla stock because - hey, this beat expectations. Marks goes on to describe second-level thinking:
The second-level thinker goes through a much more complex process when thinking about buying an asset. Is it good? Do others think it’s as good as I think it is? Is it really as good as I think it is? Is it as good as others think it is? Is it as good as others think others think it is? How will it change? How do others think it will change? How is it priced given: its current condition; how do I think its conditions will change; how others think it will change; and how others think others think it will change? And that’s just the beginning. No, this isn’t easy.
Howard Marks
In this version of events you are always thinking about the market’s response to Tesla results.
What do you think they’ll announce? What has the market priced in? Is Musk reliable? Are the people who bought because of his tweet likely to hold on if he disappoints or exit immediately? If it goes up at which price will they take profit? How big a number is now considered ‘wow’ by the market?
As Marks says: not easy. However, you need to start getting into the habit of thinking like this if you want to beat the market. You can make gameplans in advance for various scenarios.
Here are some examples from Marks to illustrate the difference between first order and second order thinking.

Some further examples
Trying to react fast to headlines is impossible in today’s market of ultra fast computers. You will never win on speed. Therefore you have to out-think the average participant.

Coming up in part II

Now that we have a basic understanding of concepts such as expectations and what the market has priced in, we can look at some interesting trading techniques and tools.
Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The trimming position effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
Hope you enjoyed this note. As always, please reply with any questions/feedback - it is fun to hear from you.
***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

Stake vs Hatch Fees Explained

--UPDATE--
In light of Christine from Hatch's announcement of a reduction to a flat $3 broker fee, I've updated in a new comment here.
Treat the direct comparison of $ below as incorrect (once Hatch update their pricing).
--Old Text--
I decided to undertake a fees comparison of the two platforms as Stake is launching on Tuesday.
Comparing Hatch and Stake, the long and short of it is:
Most people will do the latter and be DCA in to a lot of smaller companies so Stake will end up being a lot cheaper on the buy-in.
https://imgur.com/a/wkuiIl1
Comparing to US based companies, assuming you use Transferwise to deposit into a US bank account and there is no fee to transfer from the US account to their service, Transferwise appear to get a 0.6% better FOREX rate than Hatch did when I just checked - Transferwise was $0.6067 vs Hatch $0.6029 (I'm assuming the Hatch FOREX rate will be similar to Stake, can't check atm as I don't have a Stake account until Tuesday). So the break-even point for using Transferwise at current FOREX rates is about $250 (below Stake is better, above Transferwise is better), excluding IBKTD Ameritrade fees (TDA have no broker fees currently). Hatch will allow USD transfer but only if you email them so I don't think you can use this as your regular deposit strategy.
One thing to consider with IBKTD Amertrade is they are US companies who are not at all interested in your NZ tax requirements so will not help you at all in the process. Customer support will be harder to get, and using Transferwise is not a trivial process especially if you are doing very regular deposits it can become a PITA for a relatively tiny difference in fees (eg if you deposit $500/fortnight the difference in FX fees is about $3 per transaction, so just don't buy that bag of chips and save yourself the hassle of using Transferwise + foreign based company IMO - and this is coming from someone who even changes power and ISP companies every year chasing better deals!).
Once you want to withdraw money, Hatch is obviously cheaper at 0.5% (edit: despite the $8 withdrawal fee) compared to 1% with Stake (and they have a $2 withdrawl fee that will be pretty negligible if you have a lot of money invested). Hatch will do an off-market transfer of US shares so best strategy might be using Stake for deposits and Hatch for withdrawals.
Another benefit to Hatch is that they are Kiwi owned so I think more likely to be accessible in terms of Tax and customer support than an Aussie based company (Stake). Lastly with Hatch, if a company is less than $400/share then you should buy a series of Fractional share bids unless you are buying more than 2.66 share units, above that the $8 broker fee is better.
Edit: I had a user complaining about the withdrawal fee of $8 through Hatch. This is true if you are regularly buying and selling shares. Typical advice given here is directed to buy and hold strategies (so you only get stung once for a withdrawal after X number of years), if you want day trading advice there are other subs for that. See my comment here.
submitted by kinnadian to PersonalFinanceNZ [link] [comments]

40+ FREE Udemy Courses - Added Today !!

Source : https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreeOnlineCoursesWithCoupon/permalink/3432853156726870/
  1. Procurement Planning (PMI – PMP)
  2. Analytical Techniques for Business Analysis (IIBA – ECBA)
  3. Business Analysis Certification Program – The Tools
  4. Identifying Risk (PMBOK6 Aligned)
  5. Monitor Project Communications (PMI – PMP)
  6. Udemy Sitewide : Course from $10.99
  7. Splunk Basics Course
  8. Aspen Plus V11 Steady-State Masterclass Free Preview
  9. Make Your Business Work For You – Vibepreneur Training
  10. Unity Game Development for beginners
  11. Learn 39 Different Ways to Make Money Online!
  12. Verkaufsmanagement im Einzelhandel
  13. (5 Star / 82 Hours Videos) Ultimate PHP, Laravel, CSS & Sass! Learn PHP, Laravel & Sass $9.99
  14. Decision Making: Improve Team and Meeting Productivity!
  15. Curso Completo de E-Commerce usando Embudos de Marketing
  16. Basic & Essential Excel Formulas And Functions Course 2020
  17. Applied Machine Learning in R
  18. Statistics with R – Intermediate Level
  19. Statistics with R – Advanced Level
  20. Python for Beginners – Basics to Advanced
  21. Step by Step Guide to Machine Learning
  22. Complete PHP OOP Concepts for Absolute Beginners + Projects $9.99
  23. AWS Services for Solutions Architect Associates
  24. Docker Course for Beginners
  25. DevOps Fundamentals
  26. Modern JavaScript for React JS – ES6
  27. Network Protocol Ethical Hacking Course
  28. Free: Full access to 3,800 courses to University and college students @ Coursera
  29. Programa Gestor de carteras de inversión en R Studio
  30. An Advanced JQuery Practical Course
  31. The Python 3 Certification Course
  32. Learn Photoshop From Scratch Practically
  33. A Beginner’s Guide to Android App Development
  34. COVID19 Protect Me: Device Warns You if Your Hand near Face
  35. Edexcel GCE Advance Chinese 9CN0-02 Written -Core Course
  36. FOREX L’ntroduction – Trader le forex de façon autonome
  37. Master Budgets – Managerial Accounting/Cost Accounting
  38. 2020 Complete Origami: From zero to hero!
  39. HTML5 – Basics to Advanced
  40. 60 Free Courses from YouAccel : Web Development, CSS, HTML, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, PHP, MySQL, XML-AJAX, NGINX, Adobe Illustrator, Kotlin, Ruby and More
  41. 2020 – Python 3 Unit test for Beginners
  42. Step by Step Guide for Javascript – Basics to Advanced
  43. CSS – Basics to Advanced
  44. Biology Basics
  45. Your Guide to Start Software Testing Career
  46. Master Mathematics: Set Theory – Basic
  47. YouTube Marketing: Become a Digital TV Star in Your Niche
  48. Salary Negotiation – How to Ask for and Receive a Pay Raise
  49. Public Relations: Media Crisis Communications
  50. The Complete One Hour Perfect Posture Habits Course
  51. 36 FREE Courses from Simpliv: Internet of Things, Python, Cyber Security, Mobile Development, Networking and Security, Web Development, Agile, Cloud Computing, 3D and Animation & More
  52. 22 Free Microsoft Office Training : Access, Excel, Word, Forms, Kaizala, OneDrive, Microsoft Teams, Outlook & More
  53. Free : 2 Months Premium & 30% Off Annual Membership – Skillshare
  54. PUREVPN : $1.65
  55. Free: Full access to 3,800 courses to University and college students @ Coursera
  56. List of 20 FREE Popular Eduonix Courses

ADD ANY 2 ITEMS AT CART : CODE FLAT25

· $72 Cybersecurity E-Degree+$0 Mighty Cybersecurity Bundle
· $57 ( $0 DevOps E-degree+ $57 Mighty DevOps Bundle-22 Courses 159.15+ Hrs Video )
· $57 ( $0 Fullstack JavaScript Developer E-Degree+ $57 Mighty JavaScript Bundle– 22 Courses 191+ Hrs Video )
· $57 ( Mighty Web Development Bundle– 22 Courses 366+ Hrs Video + $0 Mighty Web Development Bundle 2.0– 22 Courses 187+ Hrs Video)
$52.50 Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning E-Degree+ $0 Advance Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning E-Degree
submitted by ViralMedia007 to FREECoursesEveryday [link] [comments]

[Beginner Investor] Need help vetting my thoughts!

Hi Everyone!

Been doing quite a bit of reading these past couple weeks to finally start off on my investment path, but still feel uncertain on a few points, and I was hoping some kind soul could help vet my thoughts?

  1. Due to risk apetite, current situation, 15% DWT, and pursuit of a globally diversified passive investing strategy i've narrowed it down to starting off with IWDA (Might read up more on SWRD) + EIMI for now.a. Although these ETF's are bought in foreign fx, they're still the best option in terms of TER.ie. in comparison to SGX traded alternatives for global exposure (ex. sgx s27 for S&P500)
  2. I've opened a Saxo account which i intend to grow till i hit 100K, at which point I should swap to IB.
  3. My Saxo account is set to SGD, but ultimately that setting won't really matter as IWDA and EMIM are bought on LSE so i'll have to take the forex risk regardless.
  4. Due to all the fees involved, it makes more sense to DCA into these ETF's on a quarterly basis vs for example 1K SGD on a monthly basis.
Do the above four points seem reasonable?
I'm also curious, I've got quite a bit of savings in an Irish bank account.... I'm thinking of moving that over to my SG bank using transferwise to function as my emergency fund. Or would it make more sense transferring it to SAXO to use for investing in the LSE based ETF's?

Thank you so much for any advice, i'd really really appreciate someone helping to sort out my thoughts!

[EDIT] To help clarify on the excessive acronyms
submitted by Amagahdz to singaporefi [link] [comments]

Conversion Rate Tips

https://popify.org/
conversion rate
conversion rate formula
conversion rate optimization
conversion rate euro dollar
conversion rate definition
conversion rate calculator
conversion rate euro to pound
conversion rate euro usd
conversion rate euro to inr
conversion rate usd eur
conversion rate usd to cad
conversion rate adalah
conversion rate aed to inr
conversion rate aud to usd
conversion rate abbreviation
conversion rate aud to inr
conversion rate average
conversion rate advertising
conversion rate amazon
conversion rate aud to nzd
conversion rate australian dollars to pounds
conversion rate kpi
conversion rate kg to lb
conversion rate km to miles
conversion rate kilograms to pounds
conversion rate kilometers to miles
conversion rate krw to usd
conversion rate korean won to usd
conversion rate kenyan shillings to dollars
conversion rate kg to pounds
conversion rate kwd to inr
conversion rate history
conversion rate hkd to usd
conversion rate how to calculate
conversion rate hubspot
conversion rate hong kong dollar to usd
conversion rate hkd to sgd
conversion rate hypothesis test
conversion rate home loan
conversion rate hkd to myr
conversion rate hesaplama
conversion rate experts
conversion rate ecommerce
conversion rate eur to usd
conversion rate etsy
conversion rate euro to aud
conversion rate equation
conversion rate jpy to usd
conversion rate japanese yen to usd
conversion rate jamaican dollars to us dollars
conversion rate jamaican to us
conversion rate jpy to inr
conversion rate jmd to usd
conversion rate jpy to sgd
conversion rate jod to usd
conversion rate jpy to myr
conversion rate jelentése
conversion rate facebook ads
conversion rate formula excel
conversion rate from pounds to dollars
conversion rate from usd to inr
conversion rate from euros to dollars
conversion rate formula facebook
conversion rate formula in retail
conversion rate from usd to cad
conversion rate for email marketing
conversion rate dollar euro
conversion rate dollars to pounds
conversion rate dollar to peso
conversion rate dollar to rupee
conversion rate deutsch
conversion rate dollar to yen
conversion rate definition google analytics
conversion rate dollar to shekel
conversion rate dollar to naira
conversion rate cad to usd
conversion rate currency
conversion rate calculator marketing
conversion rate cad to inr
conversion rate calculation formula
conversion rate celsius to fahrenheit
conversion rate chart
conversion rate cm to inches
conversion rate can be described as
conversion rate of dollar to naira
conversion rate of usd to inr
conversion rate optimization strategies
conversion rate optimization agency
conversion rate optimization tools
conversion rate optimization services
conversion rate optimization best practices
conversion rate of pounds to naira
conversion rate of pounds to dollars
conversion rate nzd to usd
conversion rate nedir
conversion rate nzd to aud
conversion rate naira to dollar
conversion rate nzd to inr
conversion rate nok to usd
conversion rate nzd to gbp
conversion rate new zealand
conversion rate nasıl hesaplanır
conversion rate nz to us
conversion rate meaning
conversion rate money
conversion rate marketing formula
conversion rate metric
conversion rate meaning in hindi
conversion rate miles to km
conversion rate myr to usd
conversion rate meters to feet
conversion rate meaning in business
conversion rate mm to inches
conversion rate inr to usd
conversion rate in digital marketing
conversion rate icon
conversion rate in google analytics
conversion rate instagram
conversion rate is a measure of the
conversion rate in sales
conversion rate in retail
conversion rate in ecommerce
conversion rate instagram ads
conversion rate google analytics
conversion rate gbp to usd
conversion rate google ads
conversion rate gbp to inr
conversion rate gbp to euro
conversion rate gbp to aud
conversion rate graph
conversion rate gbp to eur
conversion rate grams to ounces
conversion rate google analytics definition
conversion rate benchmarks
conversion rate berechnen
conversion rate business
conversion rate british pound to us dollar
conversion rate by date
conversion rate bells to dollars
conversion rate brazilian real to us dollar
conversion rate by channel
conversion rate business definition
conversion rate british pounds to dollars
conversion rate là gì
conversion rate lbs to kg
conversion rate landing page
conversion rate length
conversion rate linkedin
conversion rate linkedin ads
conversion rate lbs to dollars
conversion rate lead generation
conversion rate liters to gallons
conversion rate live
conversion rate retail
conversion rate rmb to usd
conversion rate rupee to dollar
conversion rate ranking facebook
conversion rate rand to dollar
conversion rate rand to pound
conversion rate rm to usd
conversion rate rupee to pound
conversion rate ranking below average
conversion rate real estate
conversion rate vs ctr
conversion rate vs exchange rate
conversion rate vnd to usd
conversion rate vs win rate
conversion rate vs bounce rate
conversion rate vietnam
conversion rate vietnamese dong to us dollar
conversion rate vs retention rate
conversion rate vs close rate
conversion rate variance gain
conversion rate pound to euro
conversion rate pounds to dollars
conversion rate pesos to dollars
conversion rate paypal
conversion rate pound to inr
conversion rate pounds to aud
conversion rate php to usd
conversion rate percentage
conversion rate pound to rupees
conversion rate pound to us dollar
conversion rate website
conversion rate wiki
conversion rate won to usd
conversion rate weight
conversion rate web analytics
conversion rate western union
conversion rate website average
conversion rate what is
conversion rate won to dollar
conversion rate website definition
conversion rate sales
conversion rate social media
conversion rate shopify
conversion rate sgd to usd
conversion rate sterling to euro
conversion rate sgd to myr
conversion rate sgd to inr
conversion rate synonym
conversion rate social media marketing
conversion rate seo
conversion rate usd to inr
conversion rate usd to aud
conversion rate usd to sgd
conversion rate usd to gbp
conversion rate usd to php
conversion rate usd to nzd
conversion rate usd to myr
conversion rate usd
conversion rate yen to usd
conversion rate yen to dollar
conversion rate youtube
conversion rate yuan to usd
conversion rate youtube ads
conversion rate yen to peso
conversion rate yen to sgd
conversion rate yen to aud
conversion rate youtube video
conversion rate yen
conversion rate today
conversion rate to usd
conversion rate table
conversion rate to euro
conversion rate to hinduism
conversion rate tableau
conversion rate temperature
conversion rate to sales
conversion rate to pounds
conversion rate twitter
bali conversion rate
bank of america conversion rate
best conversion rate
bsp conversion rate
best euro conversion rate
bank conversion rate
best penalty conversion rate
barclays conversion rate
bmo conversion rate
best free kick conversion rate
anz conversion rate
australian conversion rate
aud conversion rate
aud to usd conversion rate
australia conversion rate
aed to usd conversion rate
average conversion rate
american conversion rate
amex conversion rate
australian dollar conversion rate
currency conversion rate
cash conversion rate
canada conversion rate
canadian conversion rate
currency conversion rate calculator
current conversion rate
calculate conversion rate
cad to usd conversion rate
citibank conversion rate
commbank conversion rate
conversion rate qar to usd
conversion rate quizlet
conversion rate que es
conversion rate qar to inr
conversion rate qatari riyal to philippine peso
conversion rate quetzales to dollars
conversion rate qatari riyal to us dollar
conversion rate questions
conversion rate quotes
conversion rate qatar riyal to philippine peso
dollar conversion rate
dollar to rupee conversion rate
dollar to euro conversion rate
dollar to pound conversion rate
dollar conversion rate today
dbs conversion rate
dollar to rupee conversion rate today
dubai conversion rate
dollar to peso conversion rate
dollar to sterling conversion rate
how to calculate conversion rate
hsbc conversion rate
how to increase conversion rate
hdfc conversion rate
hong kong conversion rate
how to increase conversion rate in retail
how to improve conversion rate
how to increase conversion rate in sales
highest penalty conversion rate
hkd to usd conversion rate
gbp to usd conversion rate
gold conversion rate
gbp conversion rate
google conversion rate calculator
good conversion rate
gbp to euro conversion rate
gbp to eur conversion rate
google conversion rate
goal conversion rate
google ads conversion rate
euro conversion rate
euro to dollar conversion rate
euro to pound conversion rate
euro to usd conversion rate
euro to gbp conversion rate
euro to inr conversion rate today
ecommerce conversion rate
euro conversion rate today
eur to usd conversion rate
euro to sterling conversion rate
fx conversion rate
free kick conversion rate
fiji conversion rate
facebook conversion rate
fbar conversion rate 2018
facebook ads conversion rate
free conversion rate calculator
forex conversion rate
feed conversion rate
fbar conversion rate 2019
conversion rate zar to usd
conversion rate zar to inr
conversion rate zloty to euro
conversion rate zimbabwe dollars to us dollars
conversion rate zar to aud
conversion rate zloty to dollar
conversion rate zloty to pound
conversion rate zar to gbp
conversion rate zar to eur
conversion rate zar to us dollar
conversion rate xe
conversion rate xbox ultimate
conversion rate xpf to usd
conversion rate xcd to usd
conversion rate xpf to dollars
conversion rate xof to usd
conversion rate xaf to usd
conversion rate xpf to aud
conversion x rate
exchange rate conversion xe
sbi conversion rate
sales conversion rate
singapore conversion rate
scotiabank conversion rate
sterling conversion rate
sar to usd conversion rate
sterling to euro conversion rate
sales conversion rate by industry
sales conversion rate statistics
sek to usd conversion rate
mastercard conversion rate
money conversion rate
mexico conversion rate
monzo conversion rate
maybank conversion rate
mexican conversion rate
moneygram conversion rate
mas conversion rate
myr to usd conversion rate
mastercard currency conversion rate
rbi conversion rate
rbc conversion rate
religion conversion rate in india
rupee conversion rate
revolut conversion rate
rand conversion rate
robux conversion rate
rupee to dollar conversion rate
rand to pula conversion rate
religion conversion rate
xe conversion rate
xoom conversion rate
xbox game pass ultimate conversion rate
xpf to usd conversion rate
xoom conversion rate india
xbox live to ultimate conversion rate
xoom conversion rate today
xe currency conversion rate
xcd to usd conversion rate
xbox game pass conversion rate
inr to usd conversion rate
iceland conversion rate
india conversion rate
ing conversion rate
irs conversion rate
increase conversion rate
indian conversion rate
inr to aed conversion rate
instagram conversion rate
inr to usd conversion rate today
japan conversion rate
jpy to usd conversion rate
japanese conversion rate
jpy to inr conversion rate
jamaican conversion rate
jamaica conversion rate
japanese yen conversion rate
john lewis conversion rate
jpy conversion rate
jpy to usd conversion rate today
korean conversion rate
kg to lbs conversion rate
krw to usd conversion rate
km to miles conversion rate
kenya conversion rate
kwd to usd conversion rate
kuna conversion rate
kilo to stone conversion rate
korea conversion rate
kpi conversion rate
visa conversion rate
vietnam conversion rate
venezuela conversion rate
visa currency conversion rate
visa card conversion rate
vietnamese conversion rate
visa class b conversion rate
visa international conversion rate
visa euro conversion rate
vanuatu conversion rate
qar to usd conversion rate
qnb conversion rate
qatar conversion rate
quote conversion rate
qantas points conversion rate
query to get conversion rate in oracle apps
quote to sale conversion rate
quote to order conversion rate
qantas frequent flyer conversion rate
qantas frequent flyer points conversion rate
why is paypal's conversion rate different
why is paypal conversion rate lower
why is paypal conversion rate higher
why is conversion rate important
why is my conversion rate so low
why measure conversion rate
why sales conversion rate
why conversion rate optimization is important
why conversion rate is low
why conversion rate optimization
us conversion rate
usd to gbp conversion rate
usd conversion rate
usd to inr conversion rate
us dollar conversion rate
usd to euro conversion rate
us to canada conversion rate
usd to cad conversion rate
usd to inr conversion rate today
us to cad conversion rate
what is conversion rate
what is conversion rate optimization
what is the conversion rate from pounds to dollars
what is conversion rate in sales
what is the euro conversion rate
what is conversion rate in marketing
what is the euro to dollar conversion rate
what is the us conversion rate
what is ecommerce conversion rate
what is the conversion rate from usd to cad
nab conversion rate
new zealand conversion rate
nz conversion rate
natwest conversion rate
nfl 2 point conversion rate 2019
nfl 2 point conversion rate
nzd to gbp conversion rate
nationwide conversion rate
norway conversion rate
naira conversion rate
how to work out conversion rate
how to calculate currency conversion rate
how to increase conversion rate ecommerce
how to find conversion rate
how to increase conversion rate shopify
oanda conversion rate
ocbc conversion rate
oanda currency conversion rate
online store conversion rate
omr to usd conversion rate
online conversion rate
outpatient to inpatient conversion rate
onside kick conversion rate
osrs to rs3 gold conversion rate
opportunity conversion rate formula
lead conversion rate
lbs to kg conversion rate
lb to dollar conversion rate
live conversion rate
lloyds conversion rate
lloyds bank conversion rate
london conversion rate
land conversion rate in odisha
landing page conversion rate
lead to opportunity conversion rate
yen conversion rate
yen to dollar conversion rate
yen to pound conversion rate
yen to usd conversion rate
yahoo conversion rate calculator
yen to gbp conversion rate
yelp conversion rate
youtrip conversion rate
yen to us dollar conversion rate
yen to aud conversion rate
paypal conversion rate
pound to dollar conversion rate
peso conversion rate
pound to euro conversion rate
post office conversion rate
peso to dollar conversion rate
pound conversion rate
paypal currency conversion rate
philippine conversion rate
paypal conversion rate calculator
zar to usd conversion rate
zar to gbp conversion rate
zimbabwe conversion rate
zar conversion rate
zloty conversion rate
zar to inr conversion rate
zar to euro conversion rate
zar to nzd conversion rate
zillow lead conversion rate
western union conversion rate
is paypal conversion rate good
is feed conversion rate
is high conversion rate
is the conversion rate
is conversion rate a kpi
is conversion rate good
who has the best penalty conversion rate
can us conversion rate
can you increase conversion rate
can conversion rate be more than 100
can conversion rate
can conversion rate be over 100
which of the following can the conversion rate reveal
how can i improve my conversion rate
how can i increase my conversion rate
how can you calculate conversion rate
top penalty conversion rate
top free kick conversion rate
top strikers conversion rate
top of funnel conversion rate
top 10 conversion rate
top strategies for conversion rate optimization
top conversion rate optimization companies
top conversion rate websites
top conversion rate optimization experts
top conversion rates traffic
best penalty conversion rate premier league
best dollar conversion rate
best free kick conversion rate all time
best goal conversion rate in europe
best penalty conversion rate ever
best us conversion rate
best shot conversion rate premier league
td conversion rate
td bank conversion rate
transferwise conversion rate
thailand conversion rate
todays conversion rate
thca to thc conversion rate
$ to £ conversion rate
today conversion rate usd to inr
today dollar conversion rate
$ to euro conversion rate
conversion rate will be
worst 50 to 100 conversion rate
worst penalty conversion rate
worst currency conversion rate
worst penalty conversion rate premier league
worst century conversion rate
worst conversion rate
worst conversion rate in premier league
worst conversion rate in test cricket
worst conversion rate to usd
should i use paypal conversion rate
should you use paypal conversion rate
what should my conversion rate be
what should my website conversion rate be
to maximize conversion rate the sales funnel should be
what conversion rate did i get
do you accept conversion rate
do you calculate conversion rate
do conversion rate
how do you calculate a conversion rate hubspot
how do you work out conversion rate
how do conversion rates work
how to do a conversion rate in excel
how do you calculate sales conversion rate
how do i calculate conversion rate
how do i check my paypal conversion rate
does paypal conversion rate change
does paypal increase conversion rate
does video increase conversion rate
does conversion rate affect seo
does conversion rate decrease as traffic increases
does conversion rate help seo
what does conversion rate mean
what does a website’s conversion rate reflect
what does conversion rate mean in sales
what does conversion rate measure
was ist conversion rate
was ist eine gute conversion rate
was ist eine conversion rate
how was the conversion rate
why would conversion rate drop
how would you express the rate of conversion of the zinc
could not determine valid conversion rate
no exchange rate conversion factors could be
submitted by GiuliettaShop to Popify [link] [comments]

Troyfx Şikayet konuları Troyfx şikayetleri konusunda forex bilgileri

Troyfx Şikayet konuları Troyfx şikayetleri konusunda forex bilgileri
TroyFx Şikayet Troyfx Şikayet konuları Troyfx şikayetleri konusunda forex bilgileri, TroyFx Giriş Şikayetler

* TROYFX şikayet ve şikayetvari konuları **

TroyFx Şikayet Kampanyaları Kazancınızın bir kısmını veya bütününü harcamadan güvenilir mi? gelir artırımına gitmeyi tercih etmeniz durumunda yatırım için ilk adımı atmış olursunuz. Yatırım TroyFx Giriş Şikayetler öncelikli olarak kazancınızdan TroyFx Şikayet kalan miktarı harcamaz ve birikim yoluna gitmenizle başlamaktadır. Yatırım bireylerin tasarruf etme fikriyle başlayan bir yolculuktur ve kişilerin bu yolculuğu uzun vadeli bir kazanç modeli olarak görmeleri gerekmektedir. Yatırımın birçok çeşidi bulunmaktadır. Bilinçli bir yatırımcı olmak için tüm yatırım çeşitleri hakkında bilgi sahibi olmak ve güvenilir mi? piyasaların durumunu takip TroyFx Şikayet etmek gerekmektedir. Sermaye yatırımları; stabil değerlere ve/veya mülklere yönelik gerçekleştirilen yatırımlara denir. Yatırımcılar, sermayelerini bir işletme kurarak değerlendirmek isteyebilir.

https://i.redd.it/do0z9u257bz41.gif

Forex Reklam ve Marketing: ** [email protected] **

TroyFx Şikayet Şikayetler ve Yorumlar

TroyFx Şikayet Bu yolda güvenilir mi? atılan her adımda (makina alımı, tesis vs.) uzun vadeli ve büyüme odaklı TroyFx Şikayet bir yatırım planı yapmış olurlar. İşletme kurarak atılan bu adım sonucunda da hizmet karşılığı alınan ve kar edilen pay farklı bir sermaye aracına da dönüşebilmektedir. Varlık yatırımlarında ise daha geleneksel olarak tabir edebileceğimiz yöntemler akıllara gelmektedir; arsa alımı, gayrimenkullere yapılan yatırım veya ev yatırımları bu tarz yatırımlar arasındadır. TroyFx Şikayet Giriş Şikayetler gibi lisanslı aracı kurumların müşterilerinin pozisyonlarını olumsuz yönde etkileyecek finansal uygulamalarda bulunma, ticaret platformuna müdahale ederek fiyatları değiştirme, müşteri işlemlerine karşı pozisyon açmak veya geçerli bir sebep olmadan müşterilerin paralarını kesmek gibi yasa dışı uygulamalarda bulunmaları durumunda regülatör kurum tarafından yüksek para cezaları veya lisansın TroyFx Giriş iptali ile sektörden uzaklaştırma gibi cezalar ile karşılaşmaktadırlar.
TTroyFx Şikayet ve TroyFx giriş adresi güncellemeleri ile birlikte TroyFx yatırımcıları için en önemli konudur. TroyFx konuları ile ilgili makaleleri buradan takip edebilirsiniz.TroyFx Şikayet
Troyfx şikayet ve şikayetvari konuları
submitted by Troyfx to u/Troyfx [link] [comments]

MAME 0.215

MAME 0.215

A wild MAME 0.215 appears! Yes, another month has gone by, and it’s time to check out what’s new. On the arcade side, Taito’s incredibly rare 4-screen top-down racer Super Dead Heat is now playable! Joining its ranks are other rarities, such as the European release of Capcom‘s 19XX: The War Against Destiny, and a bootleg of Jaleco’s P-47 – The Freedom Fighter using a different sound system. We’ve got three newly supported Game & Watch titles: Lion, Manhole, and Spitball Sparky, as well as the crystal screen version of Super Mario Bros. Two new JAKKS Pacific TV games, Capcom 3-in-1 and Disney Princesses, have also been added.
Other improvements include several more protection microcontrollers dumped and emulated, the NCR Decision Mate V working (now including hard disk controllers), graphics fixes for the 68k-based SNK and Alpha Denshi games, and some graphical updates to the Super A'Can driver.
We’ve updated bgfx, adding preliminary Vulkan support. There are some issues we’re aware of, so if you run into issues, check our GitHub issues page to see if it’s already known, and report it if it isn’t. We’ve also improved support for building and running on Linux systems without X11.
You can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.

MAMETesters Bugs Fixed

New working machines

New working clones

Machines promoted to working

New machines marked as NOT_WORKING

New clones marked as NOT_WORKING

New working software list additions

Software list items promoted to working

New NOT_WORKING software list additions

Source Changes

submitted by cuavas to emulation [link] [comments]

Crypto vs Forex - Which Market is Better for Traders ... Best Forex Broker For Americans - Top Recommendation The ONLY Forex Trading Video You Will EVER Need - YouTube What is the Best Forex Broker?  Kyler & Kleveland Show ... Forex Basics - Lot Sizes, Risk vs. Reward, Counting Pips ...

The comparative freedom from regulation on the forex and its high degree of possible leveraging makes it easy to control large trades without special qualifications and a limited amount of money. That's the upside of the forex market, and the downside—participation in the forex increases both investment opportunities and risk. Traders often compare forex vs stocks to determine which market is better to trade. Despite being interconnected, the forex and stock market are vastly different. The forex market has unique ... Clients of FX Choice are provided with a choice of two account types: Classic and Pro. The main difference between the two is that the Classic one is commission-free, offering higher spreads, while the Pro account is commission based and provides tighter spreads due to the ECN environment. Besides, only the Pro account offers a choice of desktop platforms – MetaTrader 4 and MetaTrader 5. A forex position is the amount of a currency which is owned by an individual or entity who then has exposure to the movements of the currency against other currencies. The position can be either ... Forex (FX) is the market where currencies are traded and the term is the shortened form of foreign exchange. Forex is the largest financial marketplace in the world. With no central location, it ...

[index] [35866] [13367] [6837] [35294] [32440] [1780] [5665] [56830] [25886] [30241]

Crypto vs Forex - Which Market is Better for Traders ...

The ONLY Forex Trading Video You Will EVER Need THIS QUICK TEST WILL HELP YOU BECOME FINANCIALLY FREE Take it HERE: https://discover.tiersoffreedom.com To jo... 🚨🚨Trading Performance 🚨🚨 Improve Your Trading Performance at our Fundamental Trading Academy https://www.toptradersfx.com/academy (Our Academy is 1v1 ... Join our Trading Room where we discuss All Things Forex on a daily basis: https://bit.ly/2PLwUmj Forex vs Stock market - which one is better and why? Let's d... Too often new traders come into the market without getting to know the most fundamental components of foreign exchange and how currencies work. So we decided... Crypto vs Forex...Which is better to trade? Well, it's not that simple. Before you decide whether you should trade Forex (FX) or crypto, you need to take a f...

#